Optimized, Cost Effective X-Ray Imaging that Rivals MRI: X-Ray Scatter Imaging of Nanoparticle-Labeled Tissues for Early Cancer Detection (Case 2093)

Principal Investigators:

 

Christoph Rose-Petruck, PhD, Professor

Department of Chemistry

Brown University

Providence, RI

 

Jack R. Wands, MD, Professor

Bio Med Molecular, Microbiology & Immunology

Brown University

Rhode Island Hospital

Providence, RI

 

Zoltan Derdak, MD, Assistant Professor

Bio Med Medicine

Brown University

Rhode Island Hospital

Providence, RI

 

Brief Description:

 

State-of-the-art soft tissue imaging techniques are limited in the ability to detect malignant tumors especially early-stage.  For example, early detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is challenging using traditional imaging techniques on cirrhotic, nodular livers as there is low image contrast between healthy and malignant liver tissue.  HCC usually becomes symptomatic at an advanced stage when the tumor has already reached 4.5-8 cm in diameter.  It is particularly difficult to differentiate very small neoplastic lesions (early cancer) from hyperplastic nodules.  Therefore, there is an urgent need for more sensitive and specific imaging techniques to detect neoplastic lesions in the earlier stages of cancer.

                             

The technology offered here is a novel, low-cost x-ray imaging method (combination of algorithm, software, a rigid material) for the early detection of soft tissue cancers.  Developed at Brown University by Dr. Christoph Rose-Petruck, in collaboration with Dr. Jack Wands at Rhode Island Hospital, the innovation is able to detect cancers when their volumes are about 1000 times smaller than those detected under the current standard of care.  The technology uses x-ray scatter imaging via nanoparticles (NPs) with cancer-specific antibodies to target the malignancy.  Currently, inorganic nanoparticles have been shown effective.  Bio-organic, non-toxic, and other low-cost nanoparticles are under development with promising results to-date.

Our imaging technology is not a contrast agent per se rather it relies on detecting the x-rays scattered off the NPs in the target organs.  A single x-ray image is mathematically processed and yields (1) a conventional x-ray absorption image and (2) images exclusively produced by mathematical processing of the scattered x-rays.  Since x-rays are strongly scattered by NPs, these images show the locations and densities of NPs and therefore the targeted tissue is revealed.  This technology exhibits excellent sensitivity and tumor-specificity comparable to and possibly better than MRI and CT, while having substantially lower costs because it uses conventional x-ray systems.

 

Applications include for potential use in earlier clinical diagnosis as well as oncology R&D to monitor tumor growth as an image-based readout for dose-response studies with nano-immunolabels tailored to many cancer types.  Where cost-savings without sacrificing sensitivity/specificity is desirable, this technology may be easily added to current x-ray machines and software.

 

Information:

 

US patent 9,316,645 is issued (04/19/2016)
US patent application 15/088,574 is pending

Patent Information:
For Information, Contact:
Margaret Shabashevich,
Manager of Operations
Technology Ventures Office
Brown University
401-863-7499 TVO_Patents@brown.edu
Inventors:
Christoph Rose-Petruck
Danielle Rand
Zoltan Derdak
Jack Wands
Keywords:
© 2017. All Rights Reserved. Powered by Inteum